media lies

Dealing with media lies

media lies
The media is reluctant to apologise for publishing false information.

If you work in communications there will be times when you need to deal with false statements and lies that have been published or broadcast in the media.

As a former newspaper editor I’m aware that mistakes occur. What galls me is lazy journalism and the deliberate spreading of misinformation.

Sadly there are more instances of this than ever because of declining editorial standards and pressure to publish quickly online.

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Deb Frecklington interview

Bad week for Queensland political advisers

Deb Frecklington interview
Deb Frecklington’s interview with the Courier Mail created controversy over claims that she was attacking the Premier’s image and lack of children.

Being a political adviser carries responsibility to give sound advice, follow correct process and respect the role of public servants, which doesn’t always occur.

A good adviser ensures clear communication, cuts through layers of bureaucracy and troubleshoots issues. An outcome that’s good for the politician should happily be one that’s good for the public as well.

Having worked on each side of the political triangle as a journalist, pubic servant and ministerial adviser, I’ve seen good and bad across all three.

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Volcano

Kasparov ignites journalism debate

Volcano
A scientist has said a volcanic eruption in Australia is overdue.

Former world chess champion Garry Kasparov caught my attention on Twitter recently with some posts about modern media and the need to report facts.

A very intelligent man, Kasparov currently chairs the Human Rights Foundation and its International Council. In 2017, he founded the Renew Democracy Initiative (RDI).

Here’s the tweet which piqued my interest:

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Bundaberg Now

Transforming local government communications

Bundaberg Now

Here’s the text from my speech to the national local government IT conference in Coffs Harbour regarding Bundaberg Now as an example of digital disruption.

I’m very pleased that one Council has contacted me already and plans to start something similar …

Today I’ll be talking about digital disruption and how local government can transform the way in which we communicate.

The case study is Bundaberg Now – a Council owned and operated online news platform.

Christensen defined disruption in 1997 as a relatively narrow concept whereby technology evolves through quality improvements to inferior but low-priced products.

In 2016 the Productivity Commission adopted a broader definition that’s more relevant for policy makers – disruptive technologies are developments that drive substantial change.

They noted that new technologies offer opportunities for the creation of innovative businesses, a greater range of products, and new ways for governments to address policy problems.

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